Vanishing Appalachian Culture

The Book

It’s Not My Mountain Anymore is my story of growing up in a seventh generation Appalachian family. It invites you into an intimate tale of a bygone era of sweet simplicity, the closeness of family, our ties to the land and the ways of a people who knew how to make life work under any condition.

It's Not My Mountain Anymore

My Appalachian people are from a hard working stock of Scots Irish who lived in harmony with the gifts of nature. Our heritage was woven from respect for the fact that these mountains had the power to give or take life and that if you lived in balance with these hills, their bounty always proved to be plentiful. Mountain folks were provided for and had all we needed to thrive from using the skills passed down from generation to generation.

The second part of this book was written to alert readers that this quickly vanishing culture of Appalachia is being robbed from the People of the Other Side, the Appalachee Indians words to describe those of us who call Appalachia home.

I wrote It’s Not My Mountain Anymore to share a disappearing Appalachian lifestyle that I once knew and loved as a child growing up in Rabun County in the mountains of North Georgia. The rich farm land that had fed generations of my family has become a land developer’s dream. 

Mountain land is a money- generating giant. Many old homesteads have vanished, and with their disappearance, our culture is ripped away with it. Strange tracks from heavy earth moving equipment tear out the heart of our mountains to make way for progress. Whitetail deer trails disappear. Sweet water springs vanish. Eagles are evicted from high places. Scenes of untamed beauty are replaced with towering, elegantly-designed houses dotting ridges like spots on a leopard.

Giant ranges I once called my own to roam and explore began to shrink as new owners established boundaries with No Trespassing signs and security gates. Our homeland became a playground for the rich, whose garage is worth more than our homes.

barnDad once said, Th’ time will come when you’ll have t’ lock your barn at night. That time has come.

My hope for future generations is that they determine that the mountains' destiny is in their hands.

Mountain hospitality needs no formal invitation. Pull up a chair and light the lamp, learn all you can about disappearing Appalachia. When a culture is gone, it’s gone.

Reviews of It's Not My Mountain Anymore

“What a VOICE!“…Andrea Robinson, Random House

“With deep Appalachian roots, Diane appreciates your book.”…Voice message, Diane Sawyer’s office, ABC News

“Barbara is a great spokesperson. Sign her up!”…CBS This Morning

“Your writing is truly eloquent. It transports me back to my mountain. I cherish my copy…” Earl Hamner, creator of The Waltons series

“Some books are the real deal, this is one of them…” Gwen Mansini, VA

“A book full of passion, soul and powerful writings…” Appalachian Voices Magazine

My family, friends and I are honored to share It’s Not My Mountain Anymore. Thanks  for your support.

Where to Buy It's Not My Mountain Anymore